2019 Florida Film Festival Spotlight Selections

By Leslie C. Halpern

The 28th Annual Florida Film Festival, produced by Enzian Theater and held throughout Central Florida from April 12-21, 2019, offers nearly 200 narrative features and documentary short films from 41 countries around the world, in addition to celebrity guests, special events, film forums, film sidebars, parties, and the American Independent Competition. Spotlight films are hand-picked selections not in competition. A sampling of spotlight film reviews appears below.

Hail Satan? Photo courtesy of Florida Film Festival

Hail Satan?

In Spotlight Films. Screens Sunday, April 14, 2019 at 8:30 p.m. at Regal Winter Park Village and Saturday, April 20, 2019 at 7:00 p.m. at Enzian Theater.

This documentary on The Satanic Temple is not about devil worshippers, but about a group of outcasts and misfits who formed a religious sect now spread around the world to protest combining church and state, and to promote the reproductive rights of women and rights of the LGBTQ community. They adopt Satanic symbols, such as wearing black, using heavy eyeliner, donning devil’s horns, and painting pentagrams mostly to irritate authority figures, according to the Temple’s co-founder and spokesperson, Lucien Greaves. It’s all rather tongue-in-cheek until one rogue sect leader moves away from their tenet of non-violence, and takes the performance art into dangerous new territory. The film presents lots of information—presented in an entertaining manner—but never answers the question about whether or not Greaves takes himself or his Temple seriously, satirically, or a little bit of both.

  • Directed by Penny Lane
  • Stars Lucien Greaves (not his real name) and a cast of other people using fake names
  • Run Time: 95 minutes
  • MPAA Rating: R for graphic nudity, and some language
  • 4/5
Ode to Joy. Photo courtesy of Florida Film Festival.

Ode to Joy

In Spotlight Films. Screens Saturday, April 20, 2019 at 9:30 p.m. at Enzian Theater and Sunday, April 21, 2019 at 4:45 p.m. at Regal Winter Park Village.

Charlie suffers from cataplexy, a rare neurological disorder that causes loss of muscle control under extreme emotions, and in his case, feelings of joy. He lived a careful life avoiding babies, puppies, weddings, and romantic love until one day an exceptionally beautiful and spontaneous woman walks into his library and causes a scene. After this strange initial meeting, they begin a short-lived romantic relationship because of his conflicting desires to be happy and miserable at the same time. The closer he gets to happiness, the more misery he inflicts upon himself (in the form of horrible entertainment choices, unstimulating conversations, and physical pain to damper excitement). His brother and sister complicate the situation further, as does the woman’s odd co-worker. Sweet, sad, and humorous, this film includes an unusual story, an eclectic cast, and truly funny scenes depicting human frailty to which all of us can relate.  

  • Directed by Jason Winer
  • Stars Martin Freeman, Morena Baccarin, Jack Lacy, Melissa Rauch, Shannon Woodward, Jane Curtin
  • Run Time: 97 minutes
  • MPAA Rating: R for some language and sexual references
  • 5/5
Clara. Photo courtesy of Florida Film Festival.

Clara

In Spotlight Films. Screens Saturday, April 20, 2019 at 5:00 p.m. and Sunday, April 21 at 1:30 p.m., both at Regal Winter Park Village.

This Canadian science fiction film makes its Southeast Premiere at the Florida Film Festival. A disillusioned science professor, who has lost faith in love, religion, and life, hopes to find meaning by discovering another Earth-like inhabitable planet. After getting fired from his job at the university because of his bad attitude and disregard of rules, he hires a strange otherworldly young woman named Clara as his research assistant. She’s beautiful, artistic, and wiser than someone with her spotty education should be. She also has an open-mindedness that challenges the professor’s tendency to take things literally and not see beyond his facts and figures. This film is heavy with science that sometimes slows things down a bit, but otherwise is an intriguing look at the possibility of life on other planets.   

  • Directed by Akash Sherman
  • Stars Patrick J. Adams, Troian Bellisario, Ennis Esmer, Kristen Hager
  • Run Time: 105 minutes
  • MPAA Rating: Not Rated
  • 3/5
The Biggest Little Farm. Photo courtesy of Florida Film Festival.

The Biggest Little Farm

In Spotlight Films. Screens Monday, April 15 at 7:00 p.m. at Regal Winter Park Village and on Saturday, April 20 at 10:30 a.m. at Enzian Theater.

This documentary focuses on a Los Angeles couple who leave the big city to start a new life managing Apricot Lane Farms in the foothills of Ventura County. In an attempt to create a life in perfect harmony with nature, director-cinematographer John Chester (who also narrates the film) and his wife, Molly (a food blogger and chef), chronicle their eight-year endeavor to live an eco-friendly lifestyle with plants, livestock, and wildlife all working together aided by one farming expert and several others devoted to their cause. Fulfilling their dream came with many physical, financial, intellectual, and emotional challenges, which are detailed in this beautiful and inspiring film for all ages. Stunning close-ups of nature, artistic cinematography (including some clever match dissolves), engaging storytelling, dramatic scenes of birth and death, and profound insights about life and nature raise this film to a masterful level of filmmaking.  

  • Director: John Chester
  • Stars John Chester and Molly Chester
  • Run Time: 91 minutes
  • MPAA Rating: PG for thematic elements and brief language
  • 5/5
Amazing Grace. Photo courtesy of Florida Film Festival.

Amazing Grace

In Spotlight Films. Screens Saturday, April 13 at 6:00 p.m. at Regal Winter Park Village.

This unpolished documentary takes viewers behind the scenes and front row center for a two-part gospel concert by Aretha Franklin at the Watts New Temple Baptist Church in 1972. Intended as a documentary to support the gospel album, technical difficulties prevented director Sydney Pollack from finishing the film and getting it released, so it sat in the studio’s vault for more than 45 years. Now pieced together by director Alan Elliott, the film presents Franklin’s spectacular performances, complete with quirky choir singers, enthusiastic audience members (Mick Jagger attends part of it), and loving commentary by Reverends James Cleveland and C.L. Franklin (Aretha’s father). Shots are often blurry, candid, and inconsequential. Video and audio are occasionally out of sync. Apparently the technical problems also extended to the church’s air conditioning because Aretha Franklin and James Cleveland are drenched in sweat throughout both performances.   

  • Directors: Alan Elliott and Sydney Pollack
  • Stars Aretha Franklin, James Cleveland, C.L. Franklin
  • Run Time: 87 minutes
  • MPAA Rating: G  
  • 3/5

For a complete list of films and to learn more about the Florida Film Festival, visit the official website.

Leslie C. Halpern is the author of Scantily Clad Truths: Essays on Life with Clothes (and without) and 200 Love Lessons from the Movies.

2019 Florida Film Festival Overview

By Leslie C. Halpern

The 28th Annual Florida Film Festival, produced by Enzian Theater and held this year from April 12 – 21 throughout Central Florida, offers 184 feature and short films from 41 countries. The Festival includes the American Independent Competition with 20 narrative features and documentaries vying for jury awards and audience awards.

As always, Festival goers also can choose from a variety of additional programming, such as celebrity guest events, special screenings, spotlight films, sidebars, international showcase, Florida films, family films, midnight movies, parties, avant garde films, and the popular film forums offered free to the community.

Some upcoming highlights from this year’s Festival:

Woman in Motion. Photo courtesy of Florida Film Festival.
  • Opening Night Film and Party, April 12. Held at Enzian Theater, the opening night film Woman in Motion, is a first look at the documentary by director Todd Thompson about Star Trek actress Nichelle Nichols’s tremendous influence in recruiting women and minorities to the field of space exploration. The film also screens at Regal Winter Park Village at 8:00 p.m. for $25.00 a ticket.
  • Food Film Sidebar with the narrative feature Ramen Shop (directed bv Eric Khoo) and the documentary Chef’s Diaries: Scotland (directed by Laura Otalora).
Minuscule–Mandibles from Far Away. Photo courtesy of Florida Film Festival.
  • Family Film Sidebar with two features for children making their Southeast premieres. Minuscule—Mandibles from Far Away, and animated adventure directed by Helene Giraud, and the live action feature film, The Witch Hunters directed by Rasko Miljkovic.
  • Festival Block Party sponsored by Winter Park Village. Saturday, April 13 from 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. at Regal Winter Park Village in Winter Park. Free for all Festival ticket and pass holders. Meet at the Winter Park Village fountain for live entertainment and free drinks and appetizers from participating restaurants.
The Blair Witch Project. Photo courtesy of Florida Film Festival.
  • Sunday, April 14 from 8:00 p.m. – 10:30 p.m., Enzian Theater will host “An Evening with The Blair Witch,” featuring a 35mm screening of the low-budget thriller and a Q&A session with members of the cast and crew.
  • Enzian Theater hosts three filmmaker forums: “Turning the Tables: Renegade Women of Early Cinema” on Wednesday, April 17, 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.; “Sketches Insane: The Wild World of Independent Animation” on Thursday, April 18, 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.; and “Filmmaker Forum” on Friday, April 19, 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Monty Python’s Life of Brian. Photo courtesy of Florida Film Festival.
  • Closing Night Retro Film: Monty Python’s Life of Brian (directed by Terry Jones). This R-rated comedy classic from 1979 is in English and Latin with English subtitles. Sunday, April 21 at 8:30 p.m. at Enzian Theater.

For a complete list of films, parties, events, and ticket information, visit the Florida Film Festival website.

Leslie C. Halpern is the author of Scantily Clad Truths: Essays on Life with Clothes (and without) and 200 Love Lessons from the Movies.

Kid-Friendly Movies at the 2019 Florida Film Festival

By Leslie C. Halpern

Though focused primarily on movies for adults, the 28th Annual Florida Film Festival – which runs from April 12-21 – honors its tradition of also offering a family programming sidebar with unique new independently produced movies appropriate for youngsters. In addition to the sidebar, the Spotlight Films category contains another film that children and teens may enjoy watching with their parents – The Biggest Little Farm, a documentary about creating a self-sustaining rural lifestyle.

Family Programming

Minuscule–Mandibles from Far Away. Photo courtesy of Florida Film Festival.

Minuscule—Mandibles from Far Away

Screens Sunday, April 21 at 12:00 p.m. at Enzian Theater.

In this animated adventure comedy making its Southeast premiere at the Florida Film Festival, a young ladybug gets trapped in a box being shipped to the Caribbean island of Guadeloupe. The ladybug’s father gathers a team of insect heroes to help rescue the child and bring him home. This French film features animation and live action with music, sound effects, and narration (without dialogue) to help tell the story to children of ages approximately 5-10.

  • Directors: Helene Giraud and Thomas Szabo, both of whom also wrote and directed Minuscule: Valley of the Lost Ants and episodes of the television series Minuscule.
  • Run Time: 92 minutes
  • MPAA Rating: Unrated
The Witch Hunters. Photo courtesy of Florida Film Festival.

The Witch Hunters

Screens April 13 at 11:30 a.m. at Regal Winter Park.

This Serbian feature film presents two adolescents who bond together to struggle through their individual challenges. The boy is a 10-year-old with cerebral palsy and his new best friend is a brash girl at school, who believes her father’s girlfriend is a witch because of her new-age lifestyle. For the most part, however, she can’t imagine why else her father would fall in love again if not for magical influences. This is the perfect job for the boy, who escapes from his disappointing reality by pretending to be a crime-fighting superhero. Together they become the witch hunters on a supernatural quest. In Serbian with English subtitles, this film is suitable for approximate ages 10 and older. The Witch Hunters makes its Southeast premiere at the Florida Film Festival.

  • Director: Rasko Miljkovic
  • Stars Mihajlo Milavic and Silma Mahmuti
  • Run Time: 90 minutes
  • MPAA Rating: Unrated

Family Friendly Spotlight Film

The Biggest Little Farm. Photo courtesy of Florida Film Festival.

The Biggest Little Farm

Screens Monday, April 15 at 7:00 p.m. at Regal Winter Park, and Saturday, April 20 at 10:30 a.m. at Enzian Theater.

This documentary focuses on a Los Angeles couple who leave the big city to start a new life managing Apricot Lane Farms in the foothills of Ventura County. In an attempt to create a life in perfect harmony with nature, director-cinematographer John Chester and his wife, Molly (a food blogger), chronicle their eight-year endeavor to live an eco-friendly lifestyle with plants, livestock, and wildlife all working together. Fulfilling their dream came with many challenges, which are detailed in this inspiring film for all ages.

  • Director: John Chester
  • Stars John Chester and Molly Chester
  • Run Time: 91 minutes
  • MPAA Rating: PG for thematic elements and brief language

Visit the official website for more information about the Florida Film Festival produced by Enzian Theater.

Leslie C. Halpern is the author of Scantily Clad Truths: Essays on Life with Clothes (and without) and 200 Love Lessons from the Movies.

Blair Witch Returns to Florida Film Fest as Special Event

By Leslie C. Halpern

Marking the 20-year anniversary of its release, the scary pseudo-documentary, The Blair Witch Project returns to the Florida Film Festival where it was featured as the opening night film in 1999. This time it appears in a 35mm version in the coveted special event spot as “An Evening with the Blair Witch: A 20th Anniversary Celebration” on Sunday, April 14 at 8:00 p.m. at Enzian Theater in Maitland, Florida. As the filmmakers are local and will be participating in a Q&A following the screening, this event likely will sell out fast. Tickets are available now for this program and all screenings at the Festival, which runs from April 12-21, 2019.

Twenty years ago when the story broke that five local University of Central Florida film school graduates had sold their micro-budget horror film to Artisan Entertainment at Sundance Film Festival, I was lucky enough to interview the filmmakers in their studio and write articles for Orlando Sentinel, Sun-Sentinel, The Hollywood Reporter, and Markee Magazine. As proof that you should never throw anything away because someday you might need it, I dusted the creepy black widow spider webs off one of my articles from 1999, and am reprinting it below.    

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The stir created by the premiere of the low-budget thriller, The Blair Witch Project, purchased by Artisan Entertainment at this year’s Sundance Film Festival, was no less exciting than the stir created during the actual filming of the pseudo-documentary. During the month of October 1997, Haxan Films transformed the tranquil beauty of Maryland’s Seneca Creek State Park into the haunted Black Hills Forest, the site where three student filmmakers (played by Heather Donahue, Michael Williams and Joshua Leonard) mysteriously disappear during filming of a documentary about the mythical Blair Witch. Although the three students never emerge from the forest, terrifying footage of their experiences is discovered a year later.

The Blair Witch Project. Photo courtesy of Florida Film Festival.

Written, directed and edited by Daniel Myrick and Eduardo Sanchez and produced by Gregg Hale and Robin Cowie, the four men—along with co-producer Michael Monello—comprise Orlando-based Haxan Films. Sanchez grew up in Maryland, and with the assistance of The Maryland Film Commission used the benign park for the eight-day shoot.

Postproduction in their home office was more daunting than haunting, however. Eight days of shooting produced 18 hours of raw footage, which took more than a year to edit into an-87-minute film. Shot on video and 16mm film, in color and black and white, the feature is a hybrid of looks created by method filmmaking, where Haxan Films achieves amazing realism through the imperfections of the footage. Blurry shots, seemingly unedited footage, improvised lines and unplanned expletives allow the actors to film themselves experiencing terror in the haunted forest.

“The actors’ prime directive was to react to stimuli and roll camera on everything that occurred,” Myrick says. To prepare for their ordeal, the actors were given a two-day crash course in filmmaking.

The unsuspecting actors didn’t know what awaited them as they wandered through the woods, deprived of sleep, proper nourishment, and knowledge of the production team’s plans, which included nightly harassments, haunted images, and a bloody discovery wrapped in flannel.  “Actually it was just some extracted teeth with the roots attached that we got from a dentist,” Cowie says. “You can’t really tell what it is—just that it’s nasty, real nasty.”

Sanchez says although the production team spent countless hours walking through the woods before the shoot, the tedious scouting was well worth it. Their in-depth knowledge of the woods was crucial for the nightly hauntings staged by the production team. “My favorite part was waking up the actors at 3:00 a.m. and scaring them,” Sanchez says. To facilitate these supposed encounters between the filmmakers and the Blair Witch, the production team moved quietly through the woods—sometimes a mile or more—in the dark using red-lens headlamps. Filming around Halloween added to the ambience.

During filming, the actors moved to and from pre-determined locations, encountering actors and non-actors with whom they improvised scenes. Direction was limited to written notes passed to the actors as they interviewed people in town before entering the haunted forest. In the woods, the actors relied on Global Positioning System (GPS) handsets for navigation. The production team also used GPS to track them. Notes, gear, and food were exchanged via baskets marked with DayGlo orange bike flags.

Cowie, who also serves as president of the development and production company FILMstart, Inc, says although a few local actors were used for small roles, many of the people interviewed in the film were local non-actors who agreed to answer questions. “Heather went up to people and asked if they had heard of the Blair Witch,” Cowie says. “For whatever reason, some of them said ‘yes’ and related stories they had heard or television shows they had seen on the subject.”

What possessed locals to share witch stories based on a myth conjured up by the filmmakers?  Myrick says it was one of many lucky signs that appeared along the way. “On the second day of filming, we were hiding in camouflage in the woods while the actors tried to negotiate crossing a log across a river. Because they were effectively shooting on film, they had sound gear, cameras and rolls of film on their backs. I knew that if they fell into the water and soaked the camera and film, then our movie was over. We couldn’t afford to buy any more stuff. I thought to myself, ‘If they can just make it across the log, then we’re home free.’”

They made it across the log.

While Artisan Entertainment test markets the film to determine play dates and range of distribution, Haxan Films is developing more projects, including screenplays, a book detailing the production of The Blair Witch Project, a film sequel, a television series and an interactive CD-ROM, all based on Blair Witch mythology.

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For more information about “An Evening with the Blair Witch” and Florida Film Festival, visit the official website.

Leslie C. Halpern is the author of Scantily Clad Truths: Essays on Life with Clothes (and without) and 200 Love Lessons from the Movies.

To Dust – Movie Review

By Leslie C. Halpern

It’s not every day that you can see a movie entirely about death without one drop of blood spilled. In fact, To Dust offers something else you’d never expect in a drama that examines a Hasidic Jew’s slow acceptance of his young wife’s death after intensely studying physical decomposition of dying bodies – humor, of the laugh-out-loud variety.

To Dust. Photo copyright 2018 Good Deed Entertainment.

We have screenwriters Shawn Snyder (who also directed the film) and Jason Begue to thank for that, as well as actor Matthew Broderick, who fully delivers the comedic goods as Albert, a burned-out community college biology professor. Albert and Shmuel (Geza Rohrig) are from two entirely different cultures and of two vastly dissimilar mindsets. The only thing they have in common is currently a lack of purpose.

Wife’s Death from Cancer

Shmuel is too distraught over his wife’s death from cancer to focus on his cantorial work at the local synagogue or to properly father his two young sons. After enduring horrible nightmares in which he sees parts of her body decaying, Shmuel becomes obsessed with learning how bodies actually decompose, as he’s convinced that her soul is suffering until her body returns to dust. That’s when he seeks help from a contentious coffin salesman and then Albert, whom Shmuel inaccurately presumes to be an expert on the subject.

Lonely and unhappy with his job, Albert at first dismisses Shmuel as a husband driven mad by grief, which, of course, he is. But there’s something about his quest for scientific knowledge that intrigues Albert as opposed to the bored, disinterested students he teaches five days a week. So they form a reluctant bond that begins with book research and progresses to absurd “clinical trials” and “field experiments” that become more gruesome (and illegal) each time.    

Humor Keeps Things Light

Although the dream sequences and experiments can be quite disturbing, the humor throughout the film keeps things from getting too heavy or depressing. Shmuel repeatedly calls Albert a scientist, and Albert frequently refers to Shmuel as a rabbi. Neither is correct, and it shows how little they understand the world of the other. In addition, Shmuel’s two sons are convinced their mother’s ghost has entered their father’s body and is directing his increasingly odd behavior. Their obsession about exorcizing the “dybbuk” (ghost) from their father parallels Shmuel’s single-mindedness about the decomposition of his wife’s body.    

The macabre theme of this film (and its focus on Hasidic Judaism) likely will prevent it from appealing to a mass audience, and something this dark almost needs to be accompanied by a Trigger Alert. Nonetheless this is a well-made film with a clever script and delightful acting that promises to be unlike anything you’ve seen before at the cinema.

To Dust

A Hasidic cantor mourns his young wife’s death by obsessing over the details of her body’s decay.

  • Stars: Geza Rohrig, Matthew Broderick, Sammy Voit, Leo Heller, Janet Sarno
  • Director: Shawn Snyder
  • Writers: Shawn Snyder and Jason Begue
  • Genre: Dramatic Comedy
  • Run Time: 92 minutes
  • MPAA Rating: R (for language and some disturbing images)
  • Additional Information: The director, Shawn Snyder is from South Florida, and this film opens the 2019 Boca Raton Jewish Film Festival on March 10th with the filmmaker in attendance. To Dust screens in select theaters across Florida beginning March 15th.

Leslie C. Halpern is the author of Scantily Clad Truths: Essays on Life with Clothes (and without) and 200 Love Lessons from the Movies.