Boy Erased – Movie Review

By Leslie C. Halpern

According to the movie’s trailer, 77,000 people are currently being held in conversion therapy across America. This film, based on the 2016 memoir Boy Erased by Garrard Conley, tells the true story of one young man who was forced into the church-sanctioned program by his parents to erase his homosexuality.

Nicole Kidman and Russell Crowe star in Boy Erased. Photo copyright 2018 Focus Features.

The son of a Baptist preacher (Russell Crowe) and a God-fearing mother (Nicole Kidman), Jared Eamons (Lucas Hedges) is forced to confront his homosexual impulses. Although he has a steady girlfriend throughout high school (Madelyn Cline), he breaks up with her when he goes to college – eager to be free of her increasingly demanding requests for a more physical relationship. At college, he quickly befriends Henry (Joe Alwyn), a handsome, athletic young man who sexually assaults Jared in an ugly violent scene.

Year-Long Conversion Program

When it’s clear their friendship has ended because of the assault, Henry seeks revenge by outing Jared through a prank telephone call to his parents. The call prompts his father to seek the advice of church elders, who unanimously decide the boy needs conversion therapy to chase away the devil inside him. Mrs. Eamons drives her son to the extended Love In Action assessment facility where he’ll be evaluated by its self-appointed expert, Victor Sykes (Joel Edgerton, who also directed the film and wrote the screenplay), to determine whether or not he’ll need the year-long conversion program.

Not surprisingly, most gay participants do not undergo an instant “cure” during the assessment phase, and get recommended for a year-long stay at the facility. The conversion program includes public shaming, invasions of privacy, mock funerals, and physical beatings with the bible. Some attendees embrace the philosophy and want to change, others play along with the program awaiting release, and (in a melodramatic climax) Jared refuses to submit to the ridiculous inauthentic spectacle.

Fine Performances

Kidman (who hails from Australia) is especially good in this role as a sharply dressed Southern Baptist who undergoes a conversion of her own in which she’s finally able to stand up to her husband while still embracing her beliefs. Edgerton also delivers a fine performance in which we’re never quite sure how much Sykes actually believes the rhetoric he spews. For example, when he encourages the teens to divulge more of the sexual details that brought them to Love In Action, there’s a hint of salaciousness without full-blown licentiousness. Likewise, Hedges offers a nuanced performance in which it’s unclear how much of the happy boy has been erased and how much replaced with a struggling young man.

Despite the good performances, there’s often a staged feel to the scenes – a manipulation that arises partly from the material and partly from the direction. Telling audiences what to think and feel sometimes seems a little too much like conversion therapy.

 Boy Erased

  • The gay son of a Baptist preacher is sent to a strict church-supported conversion therapy program where they try to set him “straight.”
  • Stars: Lucas Hedges, Nicole Kidman, Russell Crowe, Joel Edgerton, Cherry Jones, Madelyn Cline, Theodore Pellerin, Joe Alwyn, Britton Sear, Flea, David Joseph Craig
  • Director: Joel Edgerton
  • Writer: Joel Edgerton (screenplay); Garrard Conley (author of memoir, Boy Erased)
  • Genre: Biography/Drama
  • Run Time: 114 minutes
  • MPAA Rating: R (for sexual content including an assault, some language and brief drug use)

Leslie C. Halpern is the author of Scantily Clad Truths: Essays on Life with Clothes (and without) and 200 Love Lessons from the Movies.

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